When it's hot (hot hot!) outside

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When it's hot (hot hot!) outside

Anna S
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Re: When it's hot (hot hot!) outside

EricG
Anna, great thread idea.  I think that one of the most critical things is not to run alone.  I think that all of us would agree that the best judge of our 'status' while training is often the person running right next to you.
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Re: When it's hot (hot hot!) outside

Bill Barsuhn
In reply to this post by Anna S
I freeze my water bottles about 3/4 full with gatorade the night before.  Before I leave I top them off and they are nice an cold for the first few miles.

Also avoid blacktop as much as possible (Macomb Orchard Trail is the last choice to run).

Keep your shirt on it helps to slow the evaporation from your body to the environment.
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Re: When it's hot (hot hot!) outside

Tom P.
In reply to this post by Anna S
Avoid direct sunlight when the heat and humidity rise.  The radiation-type heat from the sun is a major heat source and can be a killer.

Run into the wind to enhance evaporative cooling.  The worst scenario is when the wind is at your back and blowing at the same speed that you're running.  Choose a route that avoids sections where you'll be running directly with the wind.

If you stop sweating, stop running immediately.  That may be the last warning you get.
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Re: When it's hot (hot hot!) outside

Lauryn
In reply to this post by Anna S
Don't forget the sunscreen!  Even if it's cloudy you can still get sunburned - and then the next few runs will be miserable - if you make it out at all.  Find something waterproof (and if you're like me, you'll like the oil free stuff).

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!
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Re: When it's hot (hot hot!) outside

ssiragusa
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In reply to this post by Anna S
I ran today at 9a, in full sun with the temp starting at 92 with high humidity. A few things popped in my head.
When it's that hot here are a few things to ask and allow yourself.

Go shady: yes a shady route will really help on a hot, cloudless day

Give yourself permission to stop: not walk but completely stop, find a shady spot, drink a little water and when you think your core temp has gone down, continue on. You'll run stronger and not risk over heating.

Timing is not everything: as much as we find numbers like pace, splits, and time goals attractive. Stop in the heat. Your body is working overtime to cool itself off, even running at a slower pace is working your body much harder than you realize.

A post run comfort: Anne brought the most wonderful thing to boot camp, cold, wet towels! There was nothing like having that cold wet towel on the back of your neck to help bring down your temp and leave you felling refreshed. Other things that help: cold cold water or gatorade, dry clothes, wet wipes to get off salt, cold fruit like watermelon or even popsicles if you can keep them frozen. Yes the run is supposed to be it's own reward but these things are a pretty close second.

If the heat is more than you can bear give yourself permission to either take it inside or just skip the run. One of the chief things we all talked about in our marathon planning meeting was listening to your body. Be smart and listen. No run is ever worth a lifetime of sorrow.


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Re: When it's hot (hot hot!) outside

Anna S
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Re: When it's hot (hot hot!) outside

jogo
In reply to this post by Anna S
I was reminded today by a coworker of how important this thread is.  She was telling me of a 20-something young man who died of heat stroke over the weekend during an athletic event.  Please, please, don't ignore this. Heat stroke is not something you can train for.  It may catch you one day, just because you had alcohol the day before or caffeine that day and are a little dehydrated.  Just because you ran last week in 90 degree weather and were fine doesn't mean you will have the same experience the next time you run in over 80 degree weather or over 80% humdity.  Each run is different.  If you feel any nausea, shortness of breath, confusion, flushing without sweating, STOP and cool yourself.  Please, I beg of you.  I care about each and every one of you.  I have combined all the tips and suggestions into one posting in no specific order of importance.  Please read, read, and read again. Sincerely, Mother Hen (aka jogo)


1. one of the most critical things is not to run alone.  I think that all of us would agree that the best judge of our 'status' while training is often the person running right next to you.  

2. run early or late, not in the heat of day.
 
3. Slow down.

4. Drink ice water. Water poured over head does nothing to cool core temperature. Without cold water, core temp rises 1 degree per mile.

5. If hot and humid, run shorter distance.

6. If at Stoney, the ski trails are 10 degrees cooler.

7. Carry water.

8.I freeze my water bottles about 3/4 full with gatorade the night before.  Before I leave I top them off and they are nice an cold for the first few miles.

9. Also avoid blacktop as much as possible (Macomb Orchard Trail is the last choice to run).

10. Keep your shirt on it helps to slow the evaporation from your body to the environment.  

11. Avoid direct sunlight when the heat and humidity rise.  The radiation-type heat from the sun is a major heat source and can be a killer. Go shady: yes a shady route will really help on a hot, cloudless day

12. Run into the wind to enhance evaporative cooling.  The worst scenario is when the wind is at your back and blowing at the same speed that you're running.  Choose a route that avoids sections where you'll be running directly with the wind.

13. If you stop sweating, stop running immediately.  That may be the last warning you get.  

14. Don't forget the sunscreen!  Even if it's cloudy you can still get sunburned - and then the next few runs will be miserable - if you make it out at all.  Find something waterproof (and if you're like me, you'll like the oil free stuff).
 
15. Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!
 
16. Give yourself permission to stop: not walk but completely stop, find a shady spot, drink a little water and when you think your core temp has gone down, continue on. You'll run stronger and not risk over heating.

17. Timing is not everything: as much as we find numbers like pace, splits, and time goals attractive. Stop in the heat. Your body is working overtime to cool itself off, even running at a slower pace is working your body much harder than you realize.

18. A post run comfort: Anne brought the most wonderful thing to boot camp, cold, wet towels! There was nothing like having that cold wet towel on the back of your neck to help bring down your temp and leave you felling refreshed. Other things that help: cold cold water or gatorade, dry clothes, wet wipes to get off salt, cold fruit like watermelon or even popsicles if you can keep them frozen. Yes the run is supposed to be it's own reward but these things are a pretty close second.

19. If the heat is more than you can bear give yourself permission to either take it inside or just skip the run. One of the chief things we all talked about in our marathon planning meeting was listening to your body. Be smart and listen. No run is ever worth a lifetime of sorrow.

20. If you're a salty sweater, bring a fast-food packet of salt (or margarita Shot Bloks, my new love) on your long runs. I've found that a little nip of salt halfway through a run wards off muscle cramps and really makes me feel better.
Half Fanatic #703
Marathon Maniac #4451

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Re: When it's hot (hot hot!) outside

EricG
Great tips Jo, thanks for putting that together.  Another one that I have noticed regarding the shade that running the wooded trails in the area tend to be much cooler.  Not only the shad aspect, but the lack of concrete or asphalt and the added moisture in the woods helps.  Granted you have to use bug spray instead of sunscreen, but hey its better than the treadmill.....
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Re: When it's hot (hot hot!) outside

Bill Barsuhn
The August issue of Runner's World has an article on racing in the heat with some ideas that are usefule even for training runs.  One that I will be trying is to have a slurpee 30 - 60 minutes before a run to reduce your core temperature.  Sounds simple enough and it tastes good too!